Trail'GradeRTM
Information & FAQ
ROAD HAULING
The spindles and tires on the
Trail'GradeR are designed for
travel at highway speeds.

GRADING TOOLS

The Trail'GradeR’s blade is completely
adjustable.  The blade angle and tilt angle
are set by where the chains are locked into
the chainlocks.  The blade cutting depth of
each end of the blade is determined by the
two screw jacks at the rear of the grader.   

The grader also has a ripping claw tool.  This
tool drops down to loosen hard soil  or gravel
to prepare it for easier grading.

Both the blade and the ripping claw have the
trip feature.  When the grader is backed up,
the blade or ripping claw will trip up and stop
working.  If you back the grader to reposition
for the next pass, the operator will not have to
get out of his vehicle to raise the blade or
claw.

The Trail'GradeR has a 55 gallon drum
attached to its aft end for weight.  The grader
is fairly light so water can be added to the
drum for grading stability and emptied for
light weight trailering
.


TO
LEARN THE
BASIC ROAD
GRADING
SKILLS YOU
WILL NEED






FREE
CLICK
"HERE"

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Question:
What must I do with a gravel driveway and parking lot full of potholes and washouts?

Answer:
You must perform periodic maintenance to its surface, as you would expect to do with a lawn,
house, automobile, or anything else.  A correctly designed gravel surfaces will standup to
moderate amounts of erosion caused by traffic and/or water.  High volumes traffic and/or
water will require more frequent maintenance.

Question:
Can I pull the Trail’GradeR with my riding lawn mower?

Answer:
Probably not, the Trail’GradeR loaded with water weighs about 1000 pounds and depending
upon what you are grading, you could be pulling a load of up to 2500 pounds.

Question:
Why would I need the blade extension you sell?







Answer:
The blade extension is not necessary, but it is a nice accessory to have when you are pulling
the Trail’GradeR with a car, pickup, or SUV.  The blade will reach out just a little farther past
the edge of vehicle to ether pick up road material or place it a little farther out.

Question:
Can I spread a pile of dumped gravel?

Answer:
Yes you can.  To knock the pile down, set the blade height to about ½” to 1” above the
ground, then make multiple passes pulling gravel from the base of the pile.  Once the pile is
flattened, you must lower the blade and begin to spread the gravel to the appropriate places.

Question:
Do I need the blade-lifting tool?






Answer:
The blade weighs over 200 pounds with the blade extension installed on it.  The first lift could
be as much as 60 – 80 pounds.  The blade-lifting tool makes the job easy and safe from
possible back injury.  For a physically strong and healthy person, lifting the 7 foot blade alone
is much easier, so you could manage without it.

Question:
Why does the grader have a safety shield?

Answer:
The safety shield is there to protect you and your vehicle from serious injury from flying rocks
or a possible broken chain.

Question:
How physically strong do I have to be to operate the Trail’Grader?

Answer:
You should be at least strong enough to pick up a 30-pound object and carry it away.

Question:
How can I learn to back up a trailer?

Answer:
There are two simple rules to remember when you are learning to back a trailer.
  • Turn the top of the steering wheel in the direction you want the back of your    vehicle
    to go.
  • Turn the bottom of the steering wheel in the direction that you want the back of the
    trailer to go.
With practice and patience you will become proficient without having to think about it.

Question:
Why doesn't the Trail'GradeR have a provision for electric or hydraulic controls?

Answer:
Electric or hydraulic controls are expensive, complex, and not a practical feature.  From the
driver's seat of the towing vehicle, you cannot see what adjustments you have made or their
results without going back to look.  However, a hydraulic lift on the draw-bar or a towing
tractor works very well in raising and lowering the blade from the driver's seat.  Simplicity and
reliability are two of the Trail’GradeR’s main virtues.

Question:
Why don’t you have heavier chain for the Trail’GradeR’s blade?

Answer:
We have never broken a blade chain.  The ¼” chain is strong enough for the size of the
blade and the loads that the blade will create.  If the grader is overstressed by carelessness
or accident, the chain should fail before damaging other more expensive parts of the grader.  
For example, if someone were to pull the grader too fast into a large concrete obstacle, the
forces created could be so great that something will break, and it would be best for the least
expensive component to fail
COPYRIGHT 2010
TRAILGRADER FABRICATION, LLC.
PO BOX 1047
SEABROOK, TEXAS 77586
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
The Trail'GradeR is
manufactured in
Baytown, Texas and
has been tested
extensively in both
west Texas and the
Galveston Bay area.  
The design has proven
to be extremely
rugged and versitile.
RIPPING CLAW
AT WORK
GRADING A
DIRT ROAD

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Grader Blade Erosion and Restoration

The Trail’GradeR‘s blade is designed to accommodate two different approaches to the problem of erosion on
the bottom edge.  The Trail’GradeR’s first and primary approach is simply let to the 3/8” thick grading blade
slowly erode away until the vertical blade adjustment range becomes limited, or until the blade is only 12¾” to
13” wide.  The blade is restored by welding a piece of 3/8” thick by 1” wide steel flat bar to the lower edge of
the blade. This method of welding replacement steel to the blade is simple and inexpensive.  Complete
blade restoration could cost less than $20 in materials.

The second option is to bolt a replacement hardened or sacrificial steel edge on the lower blade.  The blade
was designed with room below the stiffener to simply drill the appropriately spaced holes through the blade
and thru-bolt on any suitable steel edge strip.

There are advantages and disadvantages to either method.  Two chief disadvantages to the bolt on hardened
steel edges are their cost and their brittle nature.  Hardened steel tends to break and chip easily, where as,
the Trail’GradeR’s standard heavy duty (but softer) steel blade will not bend, break, or chip.

The rate of blade erosion depends upon what road composition is being graded and how much time is spent
grading.  It is possible to use a grader blade for years before the erosion becomes great enough to need
restoration.






To see a
short Video
of the
Trail'GradeR
being towed
by a small
Tractor

CLICK
"HERE"

TO
SEE
A VIDEO
OF
THE
Trail'GradeR
GRADING
A
TWO LANE
ROAD
LIKE
PROJECT #3







CLICK
"HERE"